News from Surrey First Aid

Welcome to the Surrey First Aid Training news page. Here you will be able to find everything you need to know about the recent First Aid regulation updates and any other helpful information.

To access articles appropriate for your specific industry please click on the relevant tab below.

 

Omicron Update: What You Need to Know About Your Course

Omicron Update: What You Need to Know About Your Course

Given the current Covid situation and the likelihood of restrictions planned in January due to the increase in cases of the highly transmissible Omicron variant, we are reviewing all our January 2022 courses. We have now updated our policies, procedures for keeping you safe and ensure your booking with us.

 

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HSE Guidelines for Home Working

HSE Guidelines for Home Working

Now that business have made the decision to offer more flexible working, staff are sharing their time between their home office and the workplace. To ensure the safety of these staff at home employers have a duty to undertake basic tasks and risk assessments for that staff member. 

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What do do when a Child Ingests a Button Battery?

What do do when a Child Ingests a Button Battery?

A team of ear, nose and throat (ENT) specialists have demonstrated that eating honey after swallowing a button battery has the potential to reduce serious injuries in small children. Based on findings in laboratory animals, the research suggests that this common kitchen ingredient may significantly reduce morbidity and mortality from highly caustic batteries.

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Natasha Law - How to Use An Auto- Injector For A Life Threatening Allergic Reaction

Natasha Law - How to Use An Auto- Injector For A Life Threatening Allergic Reaction

Natasha’s Law targets the food manufacturers. However, her legacy the ‘Natasha Allergy Research Charity’ aims to research and support scientists to discover more about this life-threatening condition. Anaphylaxis is still a medical unknown. Children are not born with life threatening allergic reactions and can, alongside adults, develop them at any time and we still do not know why. The treatment of anaphylaxis has historically been to administer adrenaline and call 999 for an emergency ambulance.

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Changes to the ages of a child in the resusitation guidelines

Changes to the ages of a child in the resusitation guidelines

One of the major changes in the recent Resuscitation Guidelines for first aid was the change for the definition of what is considered a child. Previously we defined children as aged 1 to puberty, it has now changed to 18 years of age.

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Asthma - Is it really life threatening?

Asthma - Is it really life threatening?

The national response programme from ambulances by the NHS has recently changed the category of which they respond to asthma attacks from 18 minutes to 8 minutes. With the emphasis on immediate response, it is important to understand how asthma is a life-threatening condition. 

Asthma is considered one of the most common medical conditions in children. Asthma can be triggered by allergens around us and within our bodies creating an inflammatory response where the bronchioles tighten making it hard for the person suffering to breathe. The attack itself may be minor and require only a rest and an administration of the steroid inhaler. Sometimes though the attack could be severe.

A severe asthma attack is defined as:

In an asthma attack the airways become swollen and inflamed. The muscles around the airways contract and the airways produce extra mucus, causing the breathing (bronchial) tubes to narrow.

Symptoms of a minor asthma attack get better with prompt home treatment. A severe asthma attack that doesn't improve with home treatment can become a life-threatening emergency.

The symptoms are:

  • Severe breathlessness or wheezing
  • The inability to speak more than short phrases due to shortness of breath
  • Working the chest muscles to breathe
  • Grunting with effort in small children or bobbing of their head
  • No improvement after using a quick-acting (rescue) inhaler
    The reason why this is considered life threatening is patients can get very tired very quickly, and their deterioration is rapid. With an elevated heart rate and changes to blood chemistry levels this can trigger a life theatening change to the heart. Even though cardiac arrest due to asthma is rare, the Global Burden of Disease reports that bronchial asthma is responsible for 420,000 deaths per year worldwide.
  • What to do in a life threatening asthma attack?
    If you believe someone is having a life-threatening asthma attack it is important to call 999 quickly and state 'severe asthma' and then place the patient in a comfortable upright position. Continue to give inhalers, nebulisers, and oxygen in accordance with the instructions until the ambulance gets there in 8 minutes.

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